Safe Sleep for Baby

MedStar Franklin Square Medical Center is excited to announce that it has been officially recognized as a Cribs for Kids® National Bronze Cribs for Kids® National Bronze Certified Safe SleepCertified Safe Sleep Hospital. The Cribs for Kids® National Safe Sleep Hospital Certification program awards recognition to hospitals that demonstrate a commitment to reducing infant, sleep-related deaths by promoting and educating on best safe sleep practices. 

The Cribs for Kids® National Safe Sleep Hospital Certification program awards recognition to hospitals that demonstrate a commitment to reducing infant Sleep-Related Deaths by promoting best safe sleep practices and by educating on infant sleep safety.  By becoming certified, a hospital is demonstrating that it is committed to being a community leader and is pro-actively eliminating as many sleep-related deaths as possible.

MedStar Franklin Square recognizes the importance of safe sleep for infants and reducing the number of deaths due to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). According to the CDC there were about 1,600 deaths due to SIDS, 1,200 deaths due to unknown causes, and about 900 deaths due to accidental suffocation and strangulation in bed.

We are committed to educating our patients, community, and associates on providing the safest sleeping environment for infants. There are many myths about the causes of SIDS and sudden unexpected infant deaths. Click here to read the myths and learn the facts.

Provide a Safe Sleep Environment

In order to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death:

  • Place the baby on its back on a firm sleep surface
  • Firm mattress in a crib, bassinet or Pack ’N Play
  • No presence of crib bumpers, pillows, loose blankets, or loose bedding
  • No toys in the sleep area 

Video about Safe Sleep Courtesy of The Safe to Sleep® campaign 

 


Know the Facts

Myth: Babies can “catch” SIDS. 

Our Nurse Educators Sharing Safe Sleep Tips with the Community

Fact: A baby cannot catch SIDS. SIDS is not caused by an infection, so it can’t be caught or spread.

Myth: Cribs cause “crib death” or SIDS. 

Fact: Cribs themselves do not cause SIDS. But features of the sleep environment—such as a soft sleep surface—can increase the risk of SIDS

Myth: SIDS can be prevented. 

Fact: There is no known way to prevent SIDS, but there are effective ways to reduce the risk of SIDS.

Myth: Shots, vaccines, immunizations, and medicines cause SIDS. 

Fact: Recent evidence suggests that shots for vaccines may have a protective effect against SIDS. All babies should see their health care providers regularly for well-baby checkups and should get their shots on time as recommended by their health care provider.

Myth: SIDS can occur in babies at any age.

Fact: Babies are at risk of SIDS only until they are 1 year old. Most SIDS deaths occur when babies are between 1 month and 4 months of age. SIDS is not a health concern for babies older than 1 year of age.

Myth: If parents sleep with their babies in the same bed, they will hear any problems and be able to prevent them from happening.  

Fact: Because SIDS occurs with no warning or symptoms, it is unlikely that   any adult will hear a problem and prevent SIDS from occurring. Sleeping with a baby in an adult bed increases the risk of suffocation and other sleep-related causes of infant death. Instead of bed sharing, health care providers recommend room sharing—keeping baby’s sleep area separate from your sleep area in the same room where you sleep. Room sharing is known to reduce the risk of SIDS and other sleep-related causes of infant death.

Myth: Babies who sleep on their backs will choke if they spit up or vomit during sleep.

Fact: Babies automatically cough up or swallow fluid that they spit up or vomit—it’s a reflex to keep the airway clear. Studies show no increase in the number of deaths from choking among babies who sleep on their backs. In fact, babies who sleep on their backs might clear these fluids better because of the way the body is built.

 

Helpful facts from NIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development